Have yourself a better breakfast

It’s not easy giving up your favourite cereal. That is no accident of course, as breakfast cereals are designed to be addictive. These sugar-laden processed foods are designed to be hyper palatable, triggering the a surge of hormones that make you feel good, and leave you wanting more. As I discussed in my previous post, cereals are far from harmless, and I make the case for dropping them from your diet altogether. I can attest, as a past three-bowl-a-day cereal eater, when you kick the cravings, they eventually lose their appeal altogether. So what should we eat for breakfast? There are loads of quick and easy options to swap in for your soggy Cornflakes. There are three questions I would ask to help choose a better breakfast for yourself: 1) Are you using single ingredient foods to prepare your breakfast? Each food on your plate should contain one ingredient only, the food you are looking at. Let’s do a dummy test run..Banana. Ingredients? Banana. Nice, okay..Egg. Ingredient? Egg. Excellent. How about..Kellogg’s All Bran. Ingredients? Wheat Bran (87%), Sugar, Barley Malt Flavouring, Salt. Oh, no. But it says on the box here ‘Heart Healthy’, and ‘Fibre’? Sorry, doesn’t pass the test. (Incidentally, did anybody put their bowl of All-Bran with milk in the microwave, or was that just me and my Granny?) 2) Do you want your breakfast to consist of carbohydrates, protein, or fat? The macronutrient content of your breakfast will depend in part on your energy requirements for the day. Especially for athletes. If you are going to be taking part in an intensive training session a few hours after...

Breakfast cereals are highly-processed, junk-food, crap

Getting up in the morning during my school days was never easy, but I knew that if I could roll out of the bed and into my school uniform, a great prize awaited downstairs. A big bowl of cereal. Weetabix, or Wheat Biscs as the case may be. Cornflakes. If we had both in stock, a Weetabix-Cornflakes combo. On the weekends, we would raid my Granny’s cupboards for the serious stuff. Rice Krispies, Coco-Pops, plenty of milk of course, so that we could guzzle that chocolatey liquid-gold down at the end. During my college days, it was a free for all. Cereal for breakfast, cereal for lunch, and cereal before bed. And the best thing about it? This stuff is good for you! Heart healthy, whole wheat, part of a balanced diet, fortified with vitamins. A win-win situation. Or is it? To get to the truth about cereals we need to dive into the dark and murky world of Big Food. Nestlé is the world’s largest food company, which in 2018, spent €6.7 billion on marketing worldwide, with a net profit of around €13 billion. Kellogg’s marketing spend in 2019 was €625 million, with a profit margin of €1.3 billion. The bottom line for these giants multinational companies is financial profit, and they spend billions to make us believe that their products are good for us. They are not. They are highly-processed, junk-food, crap.The marketing strategies of companies such as Nestlé and Kellogg’s are so effective (and well they should be for the money poured into it) that their brand and products are universally accepted as part of a...

Vegan Experience

By Connie Steinbock Modern veganism  as a diet and lifestyle choice is growing in popularity all over the world and some (even if few) of my dearest friends are now vegans. As I love to explore healthier and more sustainable ways of living for myself, I decided to test the vegan lifestyle for a short period of time. While traveling and living with one of my best friends who is a vegan for more than three years, I explored cooking, buying and eating out vegan. First only planned for 4 weeks, it was so much fun that I decided to extend the experience back home in London and Berlin until the end of lent which added up my vegan journey to 10 weeks. Overall, I really enjoyed exploring vegan-friendly ingredients and materials and discovered some new to me. Trying new recipes and tasting new dishes is something I love anyway and it was great fun to do it with my friend. For inspiration on vegan food jump to the ‘What Vegans Eat‘ article, or check out my friend’s project Cómo Comer. So here’s what I learned in the 10 weeks. What is Vegan? To say it with the words of the Vegan Society, Veganism is “a philosophy and way of living which seeks to exclude—as far as is possible and practicable—all forms of exploitation of, and cruelty to, animals for food, clothing or any other purpose; and by extension, promotes the development and use of animal-free alternatives for the benefit of humans, animals and the environment. In dietary terms it denotes the practice of dispensing with all products derived wholly or partly from animals.” So, this excludes the consumption...

What Vegans Eat

By Connie Steinbock Since I started my vegan experience a little bit more than two months ago, the question most often asked was: What do vegans eat? Well, the answer is pretty simple: everything plant-based! And that’s actually a lot and can be very tasty. I don’t want bore anyone with a list of vegetable, fruits, nuts and other plant-based ingredients. So instead, here are some highlights of my favourite vegan breakfasts, lunches, dinners and snacks in the past 2 months. It’s a mix of home-made and eat out meals and of course there are many more great meals I have been eating but didn’t take photos of. Have a look at the cards, open the PDFs for links and feel free to ask for more insights on anything that catches your appetite. If you want even more beautiful vegan food inspiration, follow my friend’s vegan food project Cómo Comer on Instagram and Facebook! Be warned, you might get hungry though… Breakfast Download PDF with links to recipes here: Breakfast. Lunch Download PDF with links to recipes here: Lunch Dinner Download PDF with links to recipes here: Dinner Snacks  Download PDF with links to recipes here: Snacks Hungry? Please feel free to comment, share your recipes and ask if you have any questions, want to have any recipes or more inspiration. Want to know why vegan recipes? Read the main article ‘Vegan...

Favourite Podcast Episodes of 2016

  Podcasts continue to be one of the best ways to consume knowledge from the great minds in the world of strength and conditioning, self-improvment, and anything really. A decade ago, you would have travelled all over the world for the opportunity to hear from the best in the business and to soak up their wisdom, now you get to stream great ideas right into your ears wherever you are, for free. The only problem now is keeping up with all the excellent content that is being put out there, as the number of good podcasts proliferate. There is a podcast for everyone.. They say that you can tell a lot about a person from their podcast feed (has anyone said that yet?), and you can see mine above. 2016 was a great year for them and here are some of my  favourite episodes. Putting the list together proved tricky enough, and was subject to me actually remembering the episodes that I have listened to (which might explain the slight bias towards episodes from the latter part of the year). There are certainly great podcasts that I don’t get around to listening to, time being finite and all that. However, in no particular order, the below episodes have all been impactful on my thinking, and I highly recommend them.   Health, Movement & Self-Improvement 1)  The Joe Rogan Experience #752 Mark Sisson I say it’s in no particular order, yet this was probably my top episode of 2016, with Joe Rogan himself saying that it was one of the most informative and interesting podcasts he has ever done (which is a pretty sound endorsement...

Physical development of the young athlete: Doing it right Part 3

The first part of this series looked at the importance of providing the young developing body with lots of varied physical inputs, the pitfalls of sedentary living and early sports specialization. The second installment looked at gym training and how moving away from the conventional approach might serve us better in the long run. This third and final part will discuss nutrition; how our physical capacities are inextricably linked with what we eat. We understand that a good diet can reduce the likelihood of developing degenerative cardio-vascular diseases, but do we realize the effect our diets have on our movement? Less Grains, Please. The food we eat affects our organs, and our organs affect our movement. Paul Chek describes this connection in detail in this article: “Most people have little or no understanding of their organs in general, and because of their ignorance of what is inside them, they make diet and lifestyle choices that create stress on their organs and glands that disrupt almost every aspect of their body and mind” The practice of segmentalizing the body into separate pieces may be useful in terms of putting labels on body parts and teaching anatomy, but it has mostly served to diminish our appreciation for the oneness of the human body. Organs talk to and control muscles. Thus, Chek believes that you would be wise to look inward when dealing with chronic problems, describing how he has rehabilitated athletes with chronic muscloskeletal pain that could not be resolved until function was restored to the related glans and organs. The mechanism for this is explained as such: If an organ overheats...