Breakfast cereals are highly-processed, junk-food, crap

Getting up in the morning during my school days was never easy, but I knew that if I could roll out of the bed and into my school uniform, a great prize awaited downstairs. A big bowl of cereal. Weetabix, or Wheat Biscs as the case may be. Cornflakes. If we had both in stock, a Weetabix-Cornflakes combo. On the weekends, we would raid my Granny’s cupboards for the serious stuff. Rice Krispies, Coco-Pops, plenty of milk of course, so that we could guzzle that chocolatey liquid-gold down at the end. During my college days, it was a free for all. Cereal for breakfast, cereal for lunch, and cereal before bed. And the best thing about it? This stuff is good for you! Heart healthy, whole wheat, part of a balanced diet, fortified with vitamins. A win-win situation. Or is it? To get to the truth about cereals we need to dive into the dark and murky world of Big Food. Nestlé is the world’s largest food company, which in 2018, spent €6.7 billion on marketing worldwide, with a net profit of around €13 billion. Kellogg’s marketing spend in 2019 was €625 million, with a profit margin of €1.3 billion. The bottom line for these giants multinational companies is financial profit, and they spend billions to make us believe that their products are good for us. They are not. They are highly-processed, junk-food, crap.The marketing strategies of companies such as Nestlé and Kellogg’s are so effective (and well they should be for the money poured into it) that their brand and products are universally accepted as part of a...

Finding the motivation for training

The world has effectively ground to a halt in a bid to contain the spread of Covid-19, disrupting our usual way of life. We are all getting used to a different way of living, and in light of the closure of all gyms and restrictions on group gatherings, this includes our exercise behaviours. This poses not only a logistical challenge to our training routines and habits, but also a psychological one. For many, exercise is a social activity, and is rarely a solely individual pursuit. We go to gyms and fitness classes, we meet up with walking groups, or are members of athletic or sports teams. And for good reason. Relatedness, or perception of personal connection with others, is a highly motivating factor to sustaining behaviour. For those in sport, the health benefits are often more of a by-product of training rather than a goal in and of itself. And there-in lies the challenge. What happens when we remove that this supportive environment that many rely on? The answer in part, will depend on what motivates people to exercise in the first place. Motivation can be defined as the degree of determination, drive, or desire with which an individual approaches or avoids behaviour (1), and it is an extensively researched topic in the field of sport and exercise psychology. We can explore what motivates people to exercise engagement by looking at the goals on which individuals focus their efforts. Self-determination theory, a framework which helps us understand the elements of human motivation, distinguishes goals based on their intrinsic or extrinsic content. Intrinsic motivation refers to taking part in activity...

Mantras to Get Out of Your Head

Strength of mind is as important as strength of body, and we like to feed ourselves both kinds here at Feed Me Strength. Mantra’s are a powerful and underused tool that can rewire our brains and our belief systems. As with most things, smart people have figured this out a long time ago, with the earliest mantras composed by Hindus in India at least 3000 years ago. Mantras can take the form of affirmations to prime the brain for positivity and success, with research exploring how resultant neurophysiological reactions act to shift mindset and behaviors. They can also serve as reminders that snap us out of self-destructive thought and behaviour patterns. I recently enjoyed Mark Sisson’s article ‘7 Primal Mantras to Drive your Success’, and it got me thinking about the mantras that I use in my own life. Here are 6 that have come to my aid in situations that include: when I am stuck, when I mess up, when I am overwhelmed with information, when I get caught up in cycles of negative thinking, when I am faced with self-doubt, and when I am feeling rushed or stressed. ‘Just get started’ This one mantra is the key to overcoming the beast that is procrastination. It is the consistent message of award-winning educator and University Professor Tim Pychyl in his mission to help people who postpone acting on their intentions. He makes the point that our feelings don’t have to match the task at hand. Social psychology has shown that our attitudes follow our behaviour. So rather than waiting on feeling like going training, practicing your instrument, writing...

Rethinking and building mental health

Why is it that we intuitively appreciate that to be in good physical shape requires some form of physical exercise, yet expect good mental shape to be pre-programmed? We don’t usually wait until we have Type II diabetes before we start moving, but it often takes a catastrophic event such as a breakdown or depression before we consider mental health. Mental health. There is a stigma attached to those two words that immediately make most people switch off. Many agree that mental health is an important topic, but not one that is relevant to them. There is probably an element of protecting one’s self-esteem here, with the perception that if you are working on your mental health, there must be something wrong to begin with. There is something wrong, but it isn’t you. There is a pretty strong argument to be made that the society we live in today is broken. Of course, there are many great things about being alive today, but we certainly are not living in accordance with how humans have evolved. Today we are exposed to chronic psychological stressors which our bodies have not biologically adapted to cope with. The purpose of the hormonal stress response is to prepare the resources of the body in preparation for crisis. But what happens when the body is constantly in the ‘flight-or-fight’ mode associated with imminent threat? Constant exposure to stressors and over-activation of this stress response (allostatic load) is associated with inflammatory disease and negative mental health outcomes. We are not supposed to be working 9 to 5 jobs for numbers on a screen that can turn...

Vegan Experience

By Connie Steinbock Modern veganism  as a diet and lifestyle choice is growing in popularity all over the world and some (even if few) of my dearest friends are now vegans. As I love to explore healthier and more sustainable ways of living for myself, I decided to test the vegan lifestyle for a short period of time. While traveling and living with one of my best friends who is a vegan for more than three years, I explored cooking, buying and eating out vegan. First only planned for 4 weeks, it was so much fun that I decided to extend the experience back home in London and Berlin until the end of lent which added up my vegan journey to 10 weeks. Overall, I really enjoyed exploring vegan-friendly ingredients and materials and discovered some new to me. Trying new recipes and tasting new dishes is something I love anyway and it was great fun to do it with my friend. For inspiration on vegan food jump to the ‘What Vegans Eat‘ article, or check out my friend’s project Cómo Comer. So here’s what I learned in the 10 weeks. What is Vegan? To say it with the words of the Vegan Society, Veganism is “a philosophy and way of living which seeks to exclude—as far as is possible and practicable—all forms of exploitation of, and cruelty to, animals for food, clothing or any other purpose; and by extension, promotes the development and use of animal-free alternatives for the benefit of humans, animals and the environment. In dietary terms it denotes the practice of dispensing with all products derived wholly or partly from animals.” So, this excludes the consumption...

What Vegans Eat

By Connie Steinbock Since I started my vegan experience a little bit more than two months ago, the question most often asked was: What do vegans eat? Well, the answer is pretty simple: everything plant-based! And that’s actually a lot and can be very tasty. I don’t want bore anyone with a list of vegetable, fruits, nuts and other plant-based ingredients. So instead, here are some highlights of my favourite vegan breakfasts, lunches, dinners and snacks in the past 2 months. It’s a mix of home-made and eat out meals and of course there are many more great meals I have been eating but didn’t take photos of. Have a look at the cards, open the PDFs for links and feel free to ask for more insights on anything that catches your appetite. If you want even more beautiful vegan food inspiration, follow my friend’s vegan food project Cómo Comer on Instagram and Facebook! Be warned, you might get hungry though… Breakfast Download PDF with links to recipes here: Breakfast. Lunch Download PDF with links to recipes here: Lunch Dinner Download PDF with links to recipes here: Dinner Snacks  Download PDF with links to recipes here: Snacks Hungry? Please feel free to comment, share your recipes and ask if you have any questions, want to have any recipes or more inspiration. Want to know why vegan recipes? Read the main article ‘Vegan...